Legal Advice for Family Caregivers

By Pete Lane, 9:00 am on

There are several legal matters seniors should consider while they are still able to make wise decisions. Family caregivers often have to encourage their senior loved ones to prepare certain legal documents. Centennial elderly care professionals discuss a few important documents family caregivers should know about.

Durable Power of Attorney

This paper gives another person power to act in the senior’s best interest, should the need arise. The senior needs to choose the person he or she names very carefully. It should be someone who has the time and willingness to perform the job and has some business sense. When creating the document, make sure it mentions the words “in the event the senior becomes incapacitated.” This document may name more than one person to work as a team. It should also name successors if the original person is not able to fulfill the requirements for some reason.

Conservatorship

If there is no durable power of attorney, caregivers may have to go to court to be named the guardian of their senior loved ones. In these cases, the judge will determine if a guardian should be assigned and whether or not the guardian is a suitable person.

Living Will 

Many seniors prefer not to be put on life support. Without a living will, also called a health directive, it may be difficult for their wishes to be carried out. Advise your loved one to create a living will clearly stating the intent to be put on life support. 

If you’re in need of some time to prepare legal documents for your loved one, you can count on the high-quality respite and live-in senior care services at Home Care Assistance to help your loved one manage daily activities. We provide tailored support plans for seniors, which are designed to help them stay healthy while their family caregivers tend to other important work. For information on reliable respite, live-in, dementia, and Alzheimer’s care, Centennial residents can call us at 303.957.3100.

Bootstrap 101 Template